Sunday, February 5, 2012

The 9/11 Truth Deniers' Question that will not Go Away: Part 1

     Theories of how the September 11, 2001, attacks were carried out present us with a dilemma. Seemingly, two groups of mutually contradictory theories are impossible to believe.
In the official theory, nineteen poorly trained young men carrying out impossible feats of skill amid a dizzying array of coincidences and disproven excuses for the failure of every relevant part of the U.S. government to follow standard operating procedure. In alternative theories, hundreds or even thousands of people were involved in a massive conspiracy. How, we are asked, could that many people have kept something that big a secret from the American people?
     Propagandists for the first theory have been so successful that it has become the default theory. Rather than following simple logic by rejecting this impossible scenario, almost everyone falls into the belief that it can’t be rejected until an alternative theory has been proven. No, logic demands that the impossible first scenario must be rejected outright and that the puzzling second scenario be examined further and explained.
     Logic also demands that we question everything. In the first part of this series, I’ll cover well-trod ground by trying to answer the first question: How could that many conspirators keep that big a secret from the American people? In the second part of this series, I’ll question the basic assumption of that question and disprove it.
     If 9/11 was an inside job, it would have to have involved President Bush, Vice President Cheney, Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, WTC owner Larry Silverstein, the Israeli Mossad, other Israeli officials, several private security firms, North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), the corporate-owned media, and many others. The number of people involved must have run into the thousands.
     In answering the question as asked, whole systems thinking requires us to ask two counter questions: Are there other known instances of government successfully keeping that big a secret? If so, how did they manage it?
     The Manhattan Project, to build the world’s first atomic bomb, was just such a secret. The above top secret Manhattan Project involved 130,000 people, and it was kept a secret until the time the first atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima.
     Everyone who has ever watched a spy thriller has heard a line similar to, “All information is on a need-to-know basis, and you don’t need to know.” That’s how the Manhattan Project was conducted. 
     Let’s look at only 1,196 people involved in keeping the big secret, and how little they actually knew. You can imagine how more than 100,000 other keepers of the secret were similarly given the mushroom treatment.
     In mid-July 1945, a Portland-class cruiser named the USS Indianapolis (CA-35) delivered two atomic bombs within striking distance of Japan. Not one of the 1,196 officers and enlisted men aboard the Indianapolis knew what they were delivering. No one at the delivery point yet knew what the two crates contained. Even the location of the Indianapolis was top secret. When the Indianapolis was sunk by a Japanese submarine, its distress signal was assumed to be a Japanese trick, since no American ship was known to be in the area. When the Indianapolis failed to return to port, no one missed them because no one knew anything about them. The survivors spent the next few days going mad from hunger, thirst, and shark attacks. They were rescued only because a pilot on anti-submarine patrol accidentally noticed them in the water. Of approximately 900 men who had survived the sinking, only 317 survived the shark attacks. In the worst naval disaster in American history, 879 men took the secret of the Manhattan Project to their deaths, and not one of them even knew what the secret was.
     That’s just one vignette from the big secret known as the Manhattan Project. I’ve just described hundreds of people involved in a top secret. Not one spilled the beans, because not one of them knew enough to spill anything. Not even President Truman knew about the Manhattan Project until he “needed to know.”
     Look up from your computer for a moment. Suppose you had wanted to keep the building and furnishing of a home like yours a secret, and suppose it were hidden in a remote location.  Do you think that the furniture manufacturers knew that they were making the furniture for your home? Did the appliance manufacturers know? What about the lumber jacks and hardware suppliers? Thousands of people supplied your home, but only a few knew the location of your home.
     That’s how it was with the Manhattan Project and a number of other projects of the federal government. Use your favorite search engine to search the following: “Manhattan Project” secret “need to know.” You’ll find references to the stealth bomber, the CIA’s black budget, health issues, Area 51, and others.
     For agencies of the federal government, keeping big secrets from the American people is the norm. Whole books, praise by highly respected sources, have been written on the subject. The book Secrets: The CIA’s War at Home, is given favorable treatment by the American Journalism Review.  A Culture of Secrecy: The Government Versus the People’s Right to Know is praised by Seymour Hersh the Pulitzer Prize winning journalist who uncovered such secrets as the My Lai Massacre and America’s Abu Ghraib torture chambers. 
     The federal government’s best-kept secrets, however, are the secrets that wishful thinkers keep from themselves. Though there are many, I will delve into only one: the 9/11 false flag attacks, which I’ll present in the second part of this series.
    For more information on the September 11, 2001, false flag terror attacks, click here.

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